• The Journey: Typing “The End”

    the end

    I didn’t used to think deciding on “the end” was hard. You’d write the last line of that novel and know that’s where the story should end. This has always been the case for me–I have always known where the writing should stop. Knowing where the editing should stop is a whole other ordeal. I have been editing my current WIP for almost six months. I know that seems like a long time, but let me put that into perspective for you: I wrote the first draft in about six months. To not spend at least as much time in the editing phase, to me, is a waste. So much…

  • The Journey: Sharing a WIP

    A little over a week ago, on Twitter, I shared the aesthetic board for my current work-in-progress (herein called LW). It’s a YA urban fantasy set in Toronto, Ontario. My CP and overall goddess Rebecca Mix encouraged me to do it after hers (deservedly so) got such positive response. I am so out of my shell, y’all. I’ve never done anything like this before, and to be honest, this is one of the scariest things I’ve ever done. LW is filled with a special kind of magic, and I hope you love it as much as I do. Here’s the aesthetic board for the project that has been my focus…

  • NaNoWriMo as a Student

    NaNoWriMo 2017

    Welcome to Day 13, WriMos! This week, I thought I’d tackle an issue near and dear to my heart: NaNoWriMo as a student. Whether you’re in elementary, high school, college or university, the pressures and demands of school are always an obstacle for writing, particularly during NaNoWriMo. You’ve got school work to do; how can you expect to write 1,667 words on top of the writing you already have to do for school? I’ve participated in NaNoWriMo as a student in the past. In fact, I was working towards a Bachelor of Arts when I had my most successful NaNoWriMo. I wrote 75,000 words in 30 days, and that is still…

  • NaNoWriMo: Developing an Idea

    NaNoWriMo 2017

    Developing an idea. It sounds easy, but it’s one of the biggest decisions a writer can make. Especially when tackling longer projects (50,000 – 120,000 words), you’re committing a huge chunk of time to that project. So, developing that first idea is crucial. You’re going to be spending hundreds of hours with it, after all. So, where the heck do you start? Everyone has a different answer for this, and none of them are wrong. You start wherever that first idea sparks. Whether that’s a character, a plot, a twist, or a scene, write it down. You can always figure out the rest–that initial idea is the gold mine. For…

  • NaNoWriMo: Plantsing

    NaNoWriMo 2017

    NaNoWriMo is almost here! Are you planning or pantsing? Can’t decide? Maybe you should consider plantsing, because that’s totally a thing. Last year we discussed the difference between plotting and pantsing, so if you’re not sure what I’m talking about, that’s a good place to start. Now that we know what plotting and pantsing are, let’s dive into the hybrid: plantsing. Plantsing is a combination of plotting and pantsing, in which a writer can plot some of their novel, and pants the rest. If you’re undecided about whether to plot or pants this year, plantsing might be the perfect compromise. There are advantages and disadvantages to both plotting and pantsing.…

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