• the end

    The Journey: Typing “The End”

    I didn’t used to think deciding on “the end” was hard. You’d write the last line of that novel and know that’s where the story should end. This has always been the case for me–I have always known where the writing should stop. Knowing where the editing should stop is a whole other ordeal. I have been editing my current WIP for almost six months. I know that seems like a long time, but let me put that into perspective for you: I wrote the first draft in about six months. To not spend at least as much time in the editing phase, to me, is a waste. So much…

  • The Journey: Sharing a WIP

    A little over a week ago, on Twitter, I shared the aesthetic board for my current work-in-progress (herein called LW). It’s a YA urban fantasy set in Toronto, Ontario. My CP and overall goddess Rebecca Mix encouraged me to do it after hers (deservedly so) got such positive response. I am so out of my shell, y’all. I’ve never done anything like this before, and to be honest, this is one of the scariest things I’ve ever done. LW is filled with a special kind of magic, and I hope you love it as much as I do. Here’s the aesthetic board for the project that has been my focus…

  • Q&A with Amber Smith

    Earlier this month Amber Smith, author of The Way I Used to Be and The Last to Let Go, joined me for a Twitter chat about her writing, editing, and publication experiences. As promised, for those who missed it, you can find the full Q&A below. Enjoy! Bree: Welcome, y’all! Tonight I’m chatting with @ASmithAuthor about her new book #TheLastToLetGo, which published yesterday! We’re going to be talking everything #amwriting, #amediting, and #ampublishing. Welcome, Amber! Amber: Thank you for having me! Amber wrote a beautiful debut novel called #TheWayIUsedToBe about a girl who keeps her rape a secret. It is a stunning look into the mind of a young woman who has been…

  • new year

    New Year, New Changes

    Happy New Year, babes. I thought long and hard about how and what I wanted to say in my first blog post of 2018. So, here it is. Since 2014, when I started this blog, I have posted something new every week. In 2018, I will no longer be posting every week. In the last year, the blog has become more of a job than a passion project, which is something I do not want the blog to be. I started writing here as a way to connect with other readers and writers; as a way to share my thoughts on my favourite books and authors. I want this blog to remain…

  • “These Words Matter” At a Glance: 2017

    I can’t believe we’re three years into the “These Words Matter” segment. This year, another 12 fantastic authors contributed, and their choice titles were sometimes surprising (and often not widely popular). What’s the book that was transformative for you? This year was the first time that the “These Words Matter” segment encountered some obstacles. The roster changed slightly as the year progressed. I’m so happy with how the list turned out. These authors are so kind, generous, and talented. I can’t wait to get into another year of editing this segment. We’re 36 contributors in, and we’ve got another year of writers coming up. Maybe your favourites will be contributing…

  • My Favourite Read of 2017

    If you follow me on Goodreads, it’ll come as no surprise that I’ve been in the middle of a severe reading slump this year. With a conservative goal of 25 leisure reads (which I didn’t meet), reading has been tough. However, I did read a couple of fantastic books. My favourite read of 2017 was We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan. I found Sarah Crossan through her publicist, who sent me Apple and Rain, The Weight of Water, and One. Apple and Rain and The Weight of Water were really insightful, diverse reads. However, it was One that had me hooked (I reviewed it). If you haven’t read it yet, I suggest you do. It…

  • NaNoWriMo 2017

    NaNoWriMo as a Student

    Welcome to Day 13, WriMos! This week, I thought I’d tackle an issue near and dear to my heart: NaNoWriMo as a student. Whether you’re in elementary, high school, college or university, the pressures and demands of school are always an obstacle for writing, particularly during NaNoWriMo. You’ve got school work to do; how can you expect to write 1,667 words on top of the writing you already have to do for school? I’ve participated in NaNoWriMo as a student in the past. In fact, I was working towards a Bachelor of Arts when I had my most successful NaNoWriMo. I wrote 75,000 words in 30 days, and that is still…

  • NaNoWriMo 2017

    NaNoWriMo: Developing an Idea

    Developing an idea. It sounds easy, but it’s one of the biggest decisions a writer can make. Especially when tackling longer projects (50,000 – 120,000 words), you’re committing a huge chunk of time to that project. So, developing that first idea is crucial. You’re going to be spending hundreds of hours with it, after all. So, where the heck do you start? Everyone has a different answer for this, and none of them are wrong. You start wherever that first idea sparks. Whether that’s a character, a plot, a twist, or a scene, write it down. You can always figure out the rest–that initial idea is the gold mine. For…

  • NaNoWriMo 2017

    NaNoWriMo: Plantsing

    NaNoWriMo is almost here! Are you planning or pantsing? Can’t decide? Maybe you should consider plantsing, because that’s totally a thing. Last year we discussed the difference between plotting and pantsing, so if you’re not sure what I’m talking about, that’s a good place to start. Now that we know what plotting and pantsing are, let’s dive into the hybrid: plantsing. Plantsing is a combination of plotting and pantsing, in which a writer can plot some of their novel, and pants the rest. If you’re undecided about whether to plot or pants this year, plantsing might be the perfect compromise. There are advantages and disadvantages to both plotting and pantsing.…

  • The Journey: Progress and the Perception of Progress

    Progress is such a tricky thing. How do you mark it? How do others perceive it? In my experience, the perception of progress is far from the reality. When I’m working on a writing project, as I’m sure many other writers can relate, I keep things fairly private. My family and friends know I’m writing, because that’s what I do, but they don’t know much else. My CPs are in the loop, but other than that the progress of my current WIP is pretty elusive. Progress, for a writer, can mean any number of things. To one writer, progress might mean getting 1,500 words written. Progress to another writer might mean…

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